Spice Bush (Gallon)
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Spicebush (plug) freeshipping - Rochester Pollinators

Spice Bush (Gallon)

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$32.00
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$32.00
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Deciduous Shrub (fast growing)
Sun: Sun, Part Shade, Shade
Height: 6’–12’
Bloom: Yellow
Fruit: Glossy red (if both male and female plants are present)
Bloom time: April
Soil Moisture: Medium, Moist, Wet
Soil Type: Moist, sandy, well-drained soils.
Attracts: Butterflies, pollinators, birds
Pollinator Benefit: Larval Host for Eastern Tiger Swallowtail and Spice Bush Swallowtail

Supports 18 Native Species

Spicebush (Lindera benzoin)  is the host plant for the Spice Bush Swallowtail and the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. It is a single- or few-stemmed, deciduous shrub, 6-12 ft. tall, with glossy leaves and graceful, slender, light green branches. Leaves alternate on the branchlets, up to 6 inches long and 2 1/2 inches wide, upper surface dark green, lower surface lighter in color, obovate, tapering more gradually to the base than to the tip, tip somewhat extended margins without teeth or lobes. Dense clusters of tiny, pale yellow flowers bloom before the leaves from globose buds along the twigs. Flowers occur in umbel-like clusters and are followed by glossy red fruit. Both the fruit and foliage are aromatic. Leaves turn a colorful golden-yellow in fall.

In the North this plant is thought of as the “forsythia of the wilds” because its early spring flowering gives a subtle yellow tinge to many lowland woods where it is common. A tea can be made from the aromatic leaves and twigs.

Note: Fruit will only form if there are both female and male bushes.

info from www.wildflower.org